Which language will you make your moon and which your earth?

By Susan Moon
Essays    Reportage    Marginalia    Interviews    Poetry    Fiction    Videos    Everything   
Essays

By throwing myself headlong into the awkward and frustrating experience of writing sex, I am ceding control of my narrative.

Essays

Neil Doloricon’s art centered farmers, workers, underground revolutionaries, and those on the margins

Essays

The United States would support the Marcos dictatorship disguised as a “constitutional coup d’etat”

Essays

We walked uphill where tall cogon grasses were already starting to don their silver shade.

Essays

I became a full-time community organizer in 1971. The Marcos government declared martial law in September 1972. A month later, the Marcos military came and arrested me.

Essays

Marcos knew that power rested not just on fear and terror, but also censorship and propaganda.

Essays

On the urgency of remembering the fourteen years of Ferdinand E. Marcos, Sr.’s military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Essays

When the dead depart, it’s the living who are left behind, fractured beyond recognition

Essays

What Totaram Sanadhya’s short story tells us about the space for solidarity

Essays

I know of nothing stronger than the laughter of these women.

Essays

Creating a life in the shadow of the martial law years

Essays

The “New Society” had its own tricks. Billions disappeared from the nation’s coffers, clowns filled legislative positions.

Essays

It was Imelda as much as Ferdinand who brought about the country’s ruination

Essays

The Marcoses have always been the masters of myth-making

Essays

A brief history lesson on the fourteen-year military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Essays

The minute I arrived at the University of the Philippines as a freshman, I joined the marches.

Essays

How an Asian American literary pioneer fell into obscurity

Essays

An exploration of forms—confession, manifesto, and anthology

Essays

I was struck by the world I tasted—woods, Baja California granite, the winter of the grapes’ growth.

Essays

I needed the concoctions F poured to quiet the things that grated and grew wilder each year—the confusion of being part white in an Arab country, part Arab in an expat world.

Essays

By throwing myself headlong into the awkward and frustrating experience of writing sex, I am ceding control of my narrative.

Essays

Creating a life in the shadow of the martial law years

Essays

Neil Doloricon’s art centered farmers, workers, underground revolutionaries, and those on the margins

Essays

The “New Society” had its own tricks. Billions disappeared from the nation’s coffers, clowns filled legislative positions.

Essays

The United States would support the Marcos dictatorship disguised as a “constitutional coup d’etat”

Essays

It was Imelda as much as Ferdinand who brought about the country’s ruination

Essays

We walked uphill where tall cogon grasses were already starting to don their silver shade.

Essays

The Marcoses have always been the masters of myth-making

Essays

I became a full-time community organizer in 1971. The Marcos government declared martial law in September 1972. A month later, the Marcos military came and arrested me.

Essays

A brief history lesson on the fourteen-year military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Essays

Marcos knew that power rested not just on fear and terror, but also censorship and propaganda.

Essays

The minute I arrived at the University of the Philippines as a freshman, I joined the marches.

Essays

On the urgency of remembering the fourteen years of Ferdinand E. Marcos, Sr.’s military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Essays

How an Asian American literary pioneer fell into obscurity

Essays

When the dead depart, it’s the living who are left behind, fractured beyond recognition

Essays

An exploration of forms—confession, manifesto, and anthology

Essays

What Totaram Sanadhya’s short story tells us about the space for solidarity

Essays

I was struck by the world I tasted—woods, Baja California granite, the winter of the grapes’ growth.

Essays

I know of nothing stronger than the laughter of these women.

Essays

I needed the concoctions F poured to quiet the things that grated and grew wilder each year—the confusion of being part white in an Arab country, part Arab in an expat world.